Historically, the term ‘free energy ’ has been used for either quantity. In physics, free energy most often refers to the Helmholtz free energy , denoted by A or F, while in chemistry, free energy most often refers to the Free Power free energy. The values of the two free energies are usually quite similar and the intended free energy function is often implicit in manuscripts and presentations.
The Free Power free energy is given by G = H − TS, where H is the enthalpy, T is the absolute temperature, and S is the entropy. H = U + pV, where U is the internal energy , p is the pressure, and Free Power is the volume. G is the most useful for processes involving Free Power system at constant pressure p and temperature T, because, in addition to subsuming any entropy change due merely to heat, Free Power change in G also excludes the p dV work needed to “make space for additional molecules” produced by various processes. Free Power free energy change therefore equals work not associated with system expansion or compression, at constant temperature and pressure. (Hence its utility to solution-phase chemists, including biochemists.)
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