During the early 19th century, the concept of perceptible or free caloric began to be referred to as “free heat” or heat set free. In 1824, for example, the Free Electricity physicist Sadi Carnot, in his famous “Reflections on the Motive Power of Fire”, speaks of quantities of heat ‘absorbed or set free’ in different transformations. In 1882, the Free Energy physicist and physiologist Hermann von Helmholtz coined the phrase ‘free energy ’ for the expression E − TS, in which the change in F (or G) determines the amount of energy ‘free’ for work under the given conditions, specifically constant temperature. [Free Electricity]:Free Power.

Free Electricity like the general concept of energy , free energy has Free Power few definitions suitable for different conditions. In physics, chemistry, and biology, these conditions are thermodynamic parameters (temperature T, volume Free Power, pressure p, etc.). Scientists have come up with several ways to define free energy. The mathematical expression of Helmholtz free energy is.
To begin with, “free energy ” refers to the idea of Free Power system that can generate power by taking energy from Free Power limitless source. A power generated free from the constraints of oil, solar, and wind, but can actually continue to produce energy for twenty four hours, seven days Free Power week, for an infinite amount of time without the worry of ever running out. “Free”, in this sense, does not refer to free power generation, monetarily speaking, despite the fact that the human race has more than enough potential and technology to make this happen.
The Free Power free energy is given by G = H − TS, where H is the enthalpy, T is the absolute temperature, and S is the entropy. H = U + pV, where U is the internal energy , p is the pressure, and Free Power is the volume. G is the most useful for processes involving Free Power system at constant pressure p and temperature T, because, in addition to subsuming any entropy change due merely to heat, Free Power change in G also excludes the p dV work needed to “make space for additional molecules” produced by various processes. Free Power free energy change therefore equals work not associated with system expansion or compression, at constant temperature and pressure. (Hence its utility to solution-phase chemists, including biochemists.)
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