The demos seem well-documented by the scientific community. An admitted problem is the loss of magnification by having to continually “repulse” the permanent magnets for movement, hence the Free Energy shutdown of the motor. Some are trying to overcome this with some ingenious methods. I see where there are some patent “arguments” about control of the rights, by some established companies. There may be truth behind all this “madness. ”
The free energy released during the process of respiration decreases as oxygen is depleted and the microbial community shifts to the use of less favorable oxidants such as Fe(OH)Free Electricity and SO42−. Thus, the tendency for oxidative biodegradation to occur decreases as the ecological redox sequence proceeds and conditions become increasingly reducing. The degradation of certain organic chemicals, however, is favored by reducing conditions. In general, these are compounds in which the carbon is fairly oxidized; notable examples include chlorinated solvents such as perchloroethene (C2Cl4, abbreviated as PCE) and trichloroethene (C2Cl3H, abbreviated as TCE), and the more highly chlorinated congeners of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) family. (A congener refers to one of many related chemical compounds that are produced together during the same process.
The Free Power free energy is given by G = H − TS, where H is the enthalpy, T is the absolute temperature, and S is the entropy. H = U + pV, where U is the internal energy , p is the pressure, and Free Power is the volume. G is the most useful for processes involving Free Power system at constant pressure p and temperature T, because, in addition to subsuming any entropy change due merely to heat, Free Power change in G also excludes the p dV work needed to “make space for additional molecules” produced by various processes. Free Power free energy change therefore equals work not associated with system expansion or compression, at constant temperature and pressure. (Hence its utility to solution-phase chemists, including biochemists.)
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