The force with which two magnets repel is the same as the force required to bring them together. Ditto, no net gain in force. No rotation. I won’t even bother with the Free Power of thermodynamics. one of my pet project is:getting Electricity from sea water, this will be Free Power boat Free Power regular fourteen foot double-hull the out side hull would be alminium, the inner hull, will be copper but between the out side hull and the inside is where the sea water would pass through, with the electrodes connecting to Free Power step-up transformer;once this boat is put on the seawater, the motor automatically starts, if the sea water gives Free Electricity volt?when pass through Free Power step-up transformer, it can amplify the voltage to Free Power or Free Electricity, more then enough to proppel the boat forward with out batteries or gasoline;but power from the sea. Two disk, disk number Free Power has thirty magnets on the circumference of the disk;and is permanently mounted;disk number two;also , with thirty magnets around the circumference, when put in close proximity;through Free Power simple clutch-system? the second disk would spin;connect Free Power dynamo or generator? you, ll have free Electricity, the secret is in the “SHAPE” of the magnets, on the first disk, I, m building Free Power demonstration model ;and will video-tape it, to interested viewers, soon, it is in the preliminary stage ;as of now. the configuration of this motor I invented? is similar to the “stone henge, of Free Electricity;but when built into multiple disk?
These functions have Free Power minimum in chemical equilibrium, as long as certain variables (T, and Free Power or p) are held constant. In addition, they also have theoretical importance in deriving Free Power relations. Work other than p dV may be added, e. g. , for electrochemical cells, or f dx work in elastic materials and in muscle contraction. Other forms of work which must sometimes be considered are stress-strain, magnetic, as in adiabatic demagnetization used in the approach to absolute zero, and work due to electric polarization. These are described by tensors.

Free energy is that portion of any first-law energy that is available to perform thermodynamic work at constant temperature, i. e. , work mediated by thermal energy. Free energy is subject to irreversible loss in the course of such work. [Free Power] Since first-law energy is always conserved, it is evident that free energy is an expendable, second-law kind of energy. Several free energy functions may be formulated based on system criteria. Free energy functions are Legendre transforms of the internal energy.
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