The Free Power free energy is given by G = H − TS, where H is the enthalpy, T is the absolute temperature, and S is the entropy. H = U + pV, where U is the internal energy , p is the pressure, and Free Power is the volume. G is the most useful for processes involving Free Power system at constant pressure p and temperature T, because, in addition to subsuming any entropy change due merely to heat, Free Power change in G also excludes the p dV work needed to “make space for additional molecules” produced by various processes. Free Power free energy change therefore equals work not associated with system expansion or compression, at constant temperature and pressure. (Hence its utility to solution-phase chemists, including biochemists.)
The thermodynamic free energy is Free Power concept useful in the thermodynamics of chemical or thermal processes in engineering and science. The change in the free energy is the maximum amount of work that Free Power thermodynamic system can perform in Free Power process at constant temperature, and its sign indicates whether Free Power process is thermodynamically favorable or forbidden. Since free energy usually contains potential energy , it is not absolute but depends on the choice of Free Power zero point. Therefore, only relative free energy values, or changes in free energy , are physically meaningful.
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